Séminaire de Juri Lelli

Le 26 Mai 2015 à 10h – 11h, dans l’amphitheatre à IRCICA, Juri Lelli (ARM Ltd) présentera le séminaire:

What’s so fun about the Linux Scheduler? and why you might want to start playing this game

The last few years have seen a lot of activity on the Linux Kernel Mailing List around the Linux Scheduler. Among others, ARM Ltd. has developed solutions for efficient scheduling on heterogeneous (big.LITTLE) architectures; The RETIS Laboratory of the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna (Pisa, Italy) has invested time in developing and pushing to mainline an implementation of a well known real-time scheduling algorithm for time sensitive applications. Since I was part of the latter research activity and I recently joined the former endeavour, in this talk I will give an overview of both research activities. I will also discuss possible applications with an eye towards open questions and research opportunities. For the keywords eager, I will talk about: SCHED_NORMAL (Completely Fair Scheduling, SCHED_DEADLINE (Constant Bandwidth Server), big.LITTLE systems and Energy Models, Global Task Switching (GTS/HMP), Energy Aware Scheduling (EAS), Dynamic Voltage and Frequency Scaling (DVFS)… and beers!

Biographie

Juri Lelli received a Bachelor’s degree in Computer Engineering at the University of Pisa (Italy) in 2006, and a Master’s degree in Computer Engineering at the University of Pisa (Italy) in 2010 with a thesis titled “Design and development of real-time scheduling mechanisms for multiprocessor systems”.  He then earned a PhD degree at the Scuola Superiore Sant’Anna of Pisa, Italy (ReTiS Lab). His PhD thesis focused on reducing the gap between classical real-time theory and practical implementation of real-time scheduling algorithms on General Purpose Operating Systems, with a special focus on Linux. At the moment, he works at ARM Ltd., where he continues contributing to the Linux scheduler development.

 

Venez nombreux!

 

 

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April 28, 2015Permalink